Métabolisme et anesthésie

Juste une petite sélection d’articles sur un sujet difficile dont on cause trop peu je trouve…

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Lugli, A. K. et al. Protein balance in nondiabetic versus diabetic patients undergoing colon surgery: effect of epidural analgesia and amino acids. Reg Anesth Pain Med 35, 355–360 (2010).
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Schricker, T., Klubien, K. & Carli, F. The independent effect of propofol anesthesia on whole body protein metabolism in humans. Anesthesiology 90, 1636–1642 (1999).
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Schricker, T., Lattermann, R., Fiset, P., Wykes, L. & Carli, F. Integrated analysis of protein and glucose metabolism during surgery: effects of anesthesia. J. Appl. Physiol. 91, 2523–2530 (2001).
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van den Brom, C. E., Bulte, C. S., Loer, S. A., Bouwman, R. A. & Boer, C. Diabetes, perioperative ischaemia and volatile anaesthetics: consequences of derangements in myocardial substrate metabolism. Cardiovasc Diabetol 12, 42 (2013).
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Sato, K. et al. Glucose use in fasted rats under sevoflurane anesthesia and propofol anesthesia. Anesth. Analg. 117, 627–633 (2013).
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Li, X. et al. Comparison of mechanisms underlying changes in glucose utilization in fasted rats anesthetized with propofol or sevoflurane: Hyperinsulinemia is exaggerated by propofol with concomitant insulin resistance induced by an acute lipid load. Biosci Trends 8, 155–162 (2014).
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Morley, G. K., Mooradian, A. D., Levine, A. S. & Morley, J. E. Mechanism of pain in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Effect of glucose on pain perception in humans. Am. J. Med. 77, 79–82 (1984).
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Tanaka, K. et al. Differential effects of propofol and isoflurane on glucose utilization and insulin secretion. Life Sci. 88, 96–103 (2011).